new year resolutions for children

The Pros and Cons of New Year’s Resolutions for Children

New Year’s resolutions for children ages 5 to 12, when done well, can be a positive experience. However, if done poorly, they can set up a child to feel disappointed and inadequate, according to mother of three and family therapist Michele Southworth of the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia PA. Unkept New Year’s resolutions can be even more demotivating for kids, than they can be for adults. “New Year’s resolutions are hard enough for adults. Let’s not model for our children the feelings of making a promise to change that, by February 1, they’ve forgotten or failed; let’s not set up our kids to have that  experience,” said Ms. Southworth.

Resolutions can Help Teach your Children about the Decision-Making Process

According to Ms. Southworth, resolutions can be looked at as laying the groundwork to help children learn about the decision-making process and, when achieved, can build confidence for many kids. They can be an opportunity to help children learn how to set realistic goals, and to spearhead a discussion on realistic thinking. Parents and children can have a very fruitful conversation – how to go about making choices for yourself, and being responsible for your own success and how having goals can be helpful in life. “Achieving a New Year’s resolution can help children develop a sense of self, and of being a capable person. It can help them learn to make a decision, to evaluate it, and then to make it happen,” Ms. Southworth said. “These are work-related skills that can have a lot of value over time, but they are most effective when there is no parental pressure, and when the goals are realistic and internally-driven,” she added.

Two Concerns to Watch for When Setting New Year’s Resolutions with Kids

Parents need to guide children in a reality-based discussion that is supportive in helping a child develop the skills to make decisions. “There needs to be a balance between setting realistic, achievable goals and perhaps pushing themselves a bit to reach them, rather than feeling parental pressure to do so,” Ms. Southworh said.

Resolutions Need to Come from the Child, not the Parents

“One thing to definitely watch for is parents suggesting or setting goals for kids, rather than the child selecting a goal for him or herself,” said Southworth. For example, if a child says, “I don’t know what I should pick as a resolution,” a parent suggesting, “Wouldn’t it be great if your New Year’s resolution was to lose some weight,” is loaded with problems. “Parents should not try and sell their own ideas of a resolution to the kids. Adults need to be very clear whose goal it is,” she added. Externally-motivated resolutions can set up destructive habit patterns of pleasing others at the expense of one’s own needs, and a feeling of failure, even though the goal was not something they really wanted. If parents wish the child would pick a resolution like, “I will get my homework done on time,” the parent should really think of making their OWN resolution instead along the lines of, “I find ways to make it easier for my child to get his/her homework done on time this year,” and let the child select something of his/her own desires.

Resolutions for Children Younger than 10

“Most kids under 10 don’t really have enough of a sense of time or managing themselves for resolutions to really work,” according to Ms. Southworth. To increase the potential for success for children under 10 pick very simple and achievable goals. Recognize that for your child to be successful, parental involvement may be required. With young children, you might think about a one-time goal, or something that can be repeated monthly, rather than a longer, broader goal. One resolution is more than enough for most children.

How to Start a Conversation about New Year’s Resolutions

Ms. Southworth suggested a conversation starter such as: with the new year coming up, some people choose to create a New Year’s resolution to help them make changes in the coming year. “Is there anything that you would like to be doing differently this year? Or something you want to learn to do, or to do more of, or less of than you’ve been doing?” The younger the child, the simpler the resolution should be.

If the child picks a wildly unreachable goal parents can talk them through the decision process, “Let’s think how complicated or not that goal is – what’s going to be involved in your doing that?” Without squashing their enthusiasm, adults can talk through the mechanics – asking, “How hard will it be to do that?” said Ms. Southworth. You can talk about how aiming very high can help them push their boundaries and achieve more than they thought, but that setting a goal too high can leave them frustrated and disappointed if they end up not achieving it.

Resolutions for an Older or more Mature for their Age Child

Another thing to discuss with older children is to ask how will the child know if they succeeded, how can they measure how well they did? Again, without adding pressure. Ms. Southworth suggested that giving incentives if they follow through on a resolution is usually not effective. Is the child doing the resolution because of an internal motivation or only for the reward? Incentives can also lead to more pressure around the resolution than is good for kids.


One of the goals of ALOHA Mind Math’s programs is to build confidence in our students. We hope this article helps you decide if New Year’s resolutions can help build your child’s confidence or not, and if so, how to go about it constructively.

Read original article here.


Note for parents

At Aloha Mind Math Canada, with the help of Abacus learning, we teach students the skills to quickly analyze and deliver answers to complex math problems within seconds. This help a child’s mental learning abilities, concentration power, and holistic development of the brain. Time is essential, get your child ahead of the race. You can enroll your child for mental math classes at Aloha. Register online here or call 604-597-8663 for more details.

national competition aloha

4th National Mental Math Competition | Dec. 16, BC

Aloha Mind Math Canada is organizing its 4th National Mental Math Arithmetic Competition. After the huge success of the previous competitions, this year’s competition promises to be even bigger and better!

All Aloha Mind Math Canada students are encouraged to participate in the competition and parents are invited too. The event will be an opportunity for students to learn and grow as while testing their competitiveness and of course mental math skills. All that along with fun, games, dance and snacks!

When:

December 16th, 2018

Where:

Bombay Banquet Hall, 7455 135 Street, Surrey, BC. V3W 0M8

Time:

Arrival Time for Kids            – 10:30 A.M

Competition Starts                – 11:00 A.M

Parents Join                            – 2:00 P.M

Award Ceremony Starts      – 3:00 P.M

Competition Registration Fee:

$35 only


This competition is designed to motivate children to enhance their academic performance and to build up their speed and accuracy. Student’s participation is encouraged and we also encourage families to help children in this development. Children are working very hard for the competition and it will be fun and a learning experience for all. Students can showcase their skills acquired during their training at Aloha Mind Math. Come, witness for yourself what Aloha means to these children.

Please register by contacting us at 604-597-8663 or by visiting our office at any location nearest to you. You can also email info@alohacanada.ca for more information.

See you there!


Aloha Mind Math Canada’s Mental Arithmetic Program is an accredited international training program for children in the age group of 5-13 years to enhance their learning abilities and develop mathematical skills. It aims at stimulating both the right and left hemispheres of the brain, which assists in making the child’s thinking more efficient and effective. Children who have completed this course have demonstrated greater ConcentrationListening Ability, and Analytical Skills, aside from immense mathematical improvement.

Aloha Mind Math Canada

Top 5 Reasons To Enroll Your Child For Aloha Mind Math Classes

 

Math does not have to be boring!

A lot of us used to hate math growing up, but your child does not have to. Aloha Mind Math Canada presents a unique and a fun way to develop your child’s analytical abilities.

Aloha Mind Math is a holistic mental development process based on mental arithmetic system. It is an accredited international training program for children in the age group of 5 -13 years. This program enhances children’s learning abilities and develop mathematical skills. It aims at stimulating both the right and left hemispheres of the brain. This assists in making the child’s thinking more efficient and effective.

Top 5 reasons for your child to enroll at Aloha Mind Math Classes:

  1. Stand out of the crowd: Your child will easily stand out of the crowd. As a matter of fact it will be easier to deal with math problems and homework on a regular basis, during their regular day school.
  2. Improved concentration: The mental math techniques practiced at Aloha Mind Math Canada improves the child’s concentration levels. The program is specially designed for children from ages 5-13 which is the time when their brain is the most receptive to growth.
  3. Observation and listening: One of the most sought-after character in today’s world in a person’s listening abilities. Aloha Mind Math Canada inculcates the culture of listening and the power of observation to their students at a young age. This proves to be a great fundamental block in the child’s overall development.
  4. Analytical Skills: Good analytical skills are a must for any student. Classes at Aloha Mind Math are full of activities, fun, visual and mental learning. Moreover, students are taught the skills which make them unleash their ability to calculate complex math problems within seconds, all without the use of calculators!
  5. Self Confidence: Mental Math program at Aloha Mind Math Canada is a holistic brain development program. It greatly improves the children’s self-confidence not only when it comes to numbers, but also in all other aspects of life.

Registration is now open for new batches. For more information call Aloha Mind Math Canada at +1 604-597-8663 or Email us at info@alohacanada.ca.

Annual Aloha Competition in Alberta

The Annual Aloha mind math competition is approaching, and our students are working hard to prepare for the event.

The ceremony takes place on June 2, 2018 at 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm.

Everyone is welcome to come!

Come witness our students develop their minds and improve coordination between the two brain hemispheres.

The event will be taking place at THE GENESIS CENTRE,  COMMUNITY GYMNASIUM DOWNSTAIRS. Address : 7555 Falconridge Blvd NE #10, Calgary, AB T3J 0C9

Thank you for supporting your children in their education and mental growth; empowering them for a lifetime of success.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Scientific Study on IMPACT OF ABACUS LEARNING OF MENTAL ARITHMETIC ON COGNITIVE ABILITIES

The present research found the cognitive abilities that are being enhanced by the Abacus Learning of Highter Arithmetic (ALOHA) among children are incredible. The statistical analyses have demonstrated the effectiveness of abacus training by showing improvement in the following seven abilities: concentration, problem solving, associative memory, working memory, concept formation, creativity and ability to create a mental image and perform operations (spatial ability). As these abilities develop, the children will also improve in their academic performance, increase speed and accuracy and help to create a genius discovering its power within. The findings of this research indicate that undergoing abacus training helps in academic excellence by improving the abilities required to get good grades. As the grades or marks obtained in the examination are generally considered as the level of achievement, the success in a performance gives confidence to the learner and motivates for higher achievement.

Another aspect of brain functioning that has implications for cognitive development is lateralization. Children use both their hands in handling the abacus and also to do visualization, during which, children learn to visualize the digits in the form of beads as in the abacus and do all the manipulations using visual imagery. In fact, the finding of the current research paved the way to label the ALOHA Programme as “The course of Cognitive development”.

Click on the link below to view the document.

Scientific Study on IMPACT OF ABACUS LEANING OF MENTAL ARITHMETIC ON COGNITIVE ABILITIES OF CHILDREN